Psychology is the study of why humans behave the way they do. Topics in psychology include: how the brain works; how we learn, make decisions, and form emotional connections with other people; how social groups operate; and how to treat anxiety, depression, and addiction.

Minor in Developmental Psychology

Developmental Psychology is the study of how we learn to think, talk, make emotional connections, and interact with others from infancy to old age. It is useful for anyone considering careers working with children, adolescents, or the elderly (education, pediatrics, gerontology).


 

 First Semester Planning

We recommend that students register for approximately 15 credits each semester and no more than 16 credits in their first semester. Your schedule should be well-balanced and include coursework from a variety of subjects. A diverse schedule will help you begin your studies in potential majors and minors; explore a breadth of new knowledge across departments at Rutgers to meet SAS Core Curriculum learning goals; and survey broader academic interests through elective courses as you work to attain the required 120 degree credits for graduation.

Your schedule will look something like this: 

College Writing or English course per placement results (3 credits)

Major Exploration course (3-4 credits)

Major or Minor Exploration course (3-4 credits)

Course beyond main academic interest, such as SAS Core or elective course (3 credits)

Course beyond main academic interest, such as SAS Core or elective course (3 credits)

 Byrne or First-Year Interest Group Seminar (FIGS) (1 credit) 

 Total Credits: 15-16

 

Introductory course recommended by faculty. Include this course in your schedule:

Students with Math placement into or above Intermediate Algebra (MA:640:IMA, MA:640:CMA, MA:640:PCA, MA:640:CLG, or MA:640:CLS).

Course Title

Course Number

Credits

Subject on University Schedule of Classes

General Psychology

01:830:101

3

Psychology (830)

Students with a Math placement into Elementary Algebra (MA:640:EAL or MA:640:CMP).

Course Title

Course Number

Credits

Subject on University Schedule of Classes

General Psychology

01:830:101

3

Psychology (830)
Elementary Algebra* 01:640:025 3 Mathematics (640)

* Studenst with MA:640:CMP placement must also register for 01:640:001 Computational Skills.

Your first year of college is an opportunity for you to explore fields of interest to enhance your understanding of yourself, the world around you, and your main academic and career goals. Think of your schedule as including courses you must take (English, courses to explore potential majors, etc.) and courses you can take (everything else!) All courses are part of your degree - if necessary, review the components of the SAS degree on this page.

Through these degree components, you will curate your own unique educational experience - but we understand that this level of flexibility and freedom can feel overwhelming for new students. Like a recommendation based on a book or TV show you enjoyed, the information below can help you identify related courses to consider in your first semester.

Course Title

Course Number

Credits

Subject on University Schedule of Classes

Intro to Sociology 01:920:101 3 Sociology (920)
Cognitive Science: A Multidisciplinary Introduction 01:185:201 3 Cognitive Science (185)

The Schedule of Classes provides information about the courses being offered in a particular semester. There are literally thousands of courses offered each semester at Rutgers, and you may find it helpful to narrow down your options by looking for courses in subjects related to your potential major or minor. Use the recommendations below to find possible introductory courses in other subjects. 

To find potential courses in other subjects related to this one:

1. On the Schedule of Classes, select the current term, location "New Brunswick" and level "undergraduate". Click continue.

2. In the Search By box, click the "search multiple subjects" link. Select the following departments:

Biological Sciences (119)

Cognitive Science (185)

Criminal Justice (202)

Sociology (920)

3. In Section Status, deselect Closed

4. In Level of Study, deselect 300 and 400. In general, 100 and 200 are appropriate for first-year students, 300 and 400 are often more appropriate for students with more familiarity with the subject. If you are interested in registering for a 300 or 400 level course, consult with an advisor before registering. 

Review these courses for possible inclusion in your first-semester schedule, or to consider for future semesters.

 

Suggestions for Transfer Students interested in Pursuing Psychology

For your first semester, we want you to focus on selecting appropriate courses, begin to understand the expectations and rigor of college, and identify resources to help you succeed at Rutgers. But, we also know that it is important to provide information for future planning.

In addition to the information below, students interested in exploring possible career options may find this resource from the Office of Career Exploration and Success helpful - you'll find that a degree in this subject prepares you for a wide variety of career options!

If you attended a school that had a 2-semester introductory psych course, you must have completed both semesters to have it transfer as equivalent to Gen Psych. If you took 1 semester, then you must take General Psych 101 at Rutgers. However, because you have had some psychology, you can request an override to add another psych course the same semester as you take Gen Psych.

If you intend a career in Psychology, you should consider getting involved in a research lab run by one of the Psych department faculty members. You can earn credits that can be applied to the major or minor (830:391). Not only does this give you some exposure to psychological research, but it is also a means of getting to know the faculty and can lead to a letter of recommendation for graduate school or work. Contact Psych advising for more information on this option (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)

If you are transferring from a community college, you may transfer an introductory psychology course equivalent to our Gen Psych, a statistics course equivalent to our Quantitative Methods, and 2 other psychology elective courses which will transfer as lower level electives (830:291, 292).

If you are transferring from a four-year college or university, you may transfer an intro psych course, statistics (if it covers the same material our course Quantitative Methods does), and 4 other psychology elective courses. The elective courses will transfer as equivalent to the ones we offer; if the course is not one that we offer, you will receive either lower level elective credit (830:291) upper level general elective credit (830:385) based on our assessment of the course.

 

Additional Information Beyond the Classroom

As a Psychology major, you will have the opportunity to work in research labs, conduct experiments, and work in clinical settings such as schools, hospitals, and clinics in our field work and internship programs.

  • Research with faculty members and graduate students
  • Fieldwork in Child Development
  • Fieldwork in Autism
  • Fieldwork with Foster Care
  • Internship in Applied and Community Psychology

Honors program is a senior research thesis mentored by a faculty member

Many majors enroll directly in graduate programs in Psychology ranging from Masters programs in counseling, industrial/organizational, and school psych to Doctoral programs (PhD and PsyD) in clinical, research, and core academic areas of Psychology (Neuroscience, Clinical, Cognitive, and Social psych).

Others use Psychology as a foundation for graduate programs in Law, Medicine, and Business.

Those who opt to enter the workforce directly obtain positions in business and government often in social services